Drinking Champagne


last update: 07 May 2020


The
Coronavirus disease 2019 was first identified in December 2019, and on 11 March 2020 it was declared a pandemic. Efforts to prevent the virus spreading included travel restrictions, quarantines, curfews, event postponements and cancellations, and lockdowns all around the world. Recommended measures to prevent infection included frequent hand washing, social distancing (maintaining physical distance from others), and keeping hands away from the face.

My wife and I followed the general rule, '
stay at home and only go out for essentials', e.g. food, medication, etc. So we decided to drink a small glass of Champagne each evening with our meal. In order to keep costs down we extended our definition of Champagne to any producer using traditional methods, but we also started by restricting our choice to rosé Champagne. In addition to the pleasure associated with the pop of a Champagne cork, and all the bubbles, etc., it also contains fewer calories than with red or white wine. And there is evidence that drinking Champagne can reduce the risk of both diabetes and dementia, so it's in fact medicinal.

Traditional methods is equivalent to 'méthode champenoise', i.e. a second fermentation in the bottle through the addition of yeast after the first fermentation. When this method is used it must be mentioned on the label.

To make it more meaningful I have put together this webpage on our tastings and impressions.

Basics


The grapes
Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, and Chardonnay are primarily used to produce almost all Champagne.

Most of the Champagne produced today is "
non-vintage", meaning that it is a blended product of grapes from multiple vintages. Most of the base will be from a single year vintage with producers blending anywhere from 10–15% (even as high as 40%) of wine from older vintages. Wikipedia has a list of Champagne houses.
If the conditions of a particular vintage are favourable, some producers will make a
vintage wine that must be composed of 100% of the grapes from that vintage year.

A
cuvée de prestige is a proprietary blended wine that is considered to be the top of a producer's range, e.g. Moët & Chandon's Dom Pérignon (a cuvée is a vat, but can also mean batch or blend).
Blanc de Noirs is a white wine produced entirely from black grapes.
Blanc de blancs is used for Champagne made exclusively from Chardonnay grapes or on rare occasions from Pinot blanc. The term is occasionally used in other sparkling wine-producing regions, usually to denote Chardonnay-only sparkling wine.
Rosé Champagne is produced either by leaving the clear juice of black grapes to macerate on its skins for a brief time (known as the saignée method) or, more commonly, by adding a small amount of still Pinot Noir red wine to the sparkling wine cuvée.

Just after
disgorgement a 'liqueur de dosage' (a blend of cane sugar and wine) is added to adjust the level of sugar in the Champagne when bottled for sale, and hence the sweetness of the finished wine. Today this dosage is used to fine tune the perception of acidity in the wine.
Brut Zero has no added sugar and will usually be very dry (less than 3 grams of residual sugar per litre)
Extra Brut (less than 6 grams of sugar per litre)
Brut (less than 12 grams)
Extra Dry (between 12 and 17 grams)
Sec (between 17 and 32 grams)
Demi-sec (between 32 and 50 grams)
Doux (50 grams).

In addition to Champagne there are also sparkling wines. We have included these sparkling wines in our list only when the producers explicitly mention the use of traditional methods of production.

Crémant is another type of sparkling wine which also uses the same traditional methods as used for Champagne. There are eight appellations in France, and there is also a Crémant de Luxembourg.

Cava is a sparking Spanish wine, and only wines produced using traditional methods are allowed to be call Cava. The Macabeo, Parellada and Xarel·lo are the most popular and traditional grape varieties used in Cava.

Just as a reminder, Champagne is a luxury wine, whereas Cava and Crémant are usually priced as comfort wines, appetisers, or something to be drunk anytime, anyplace, between friends. I will admit that I've seen that Cava producers prefer to call their wine 'affordable luxury'. Anyway between Cava and Crémant my preference is for a good rosado Cava.

Prices


Champagne Amour de Deutz Rosé €139.95
Champagne Veuve Clicquot 2008 Rosé €79.95
Champagne Ruinart Rosé €69.95 - €71.99 - €74.95
Champagne Laurent-Perrier Cuvée Rosé €58.99 - €64.95

Champagne Louis Roederer Brut Rose 2013 €62.50
Champagne Lamiable Cuvée Héliades €60.51

Champagne Gosset Petite Douceur Rosé €60.05
Champagne
Perrier-Jouët Blason Rosé €59.80
Champagne Bollinger Rosé Brut €59.00

Champagne Charles de Cazanove Clara Morgane €51.20
Champagne Carabiniers du Prince de Monaco Rosé Brut €49.95 - €56.52

Champagne Vranken Diamant Rosé €49.90
Champagne Veuve Clicquot Rosé €47.85 - €50.50 - €57.99 - €59.50
Champagne Taittinger Prestige Rosé €43.95
Champagne Louis de Sacy Rosé de Saignée Brut €43.64
Champagne Moët & Chandon Rosé Impérial €41.49 - €41.95

Champagne Besserat de Bellefon Rosé Brut €39.99
Champagne Besserat de Bellefon Cuvée des Moines Brut Rosé €39.99
Champagne Mumm Le Rosé Brut €39.95 - €42.69
Champagne Gratiot & Cie 2014 'Désiré Gratiot' Rosé de Saignée Extra-Brut €39.38
Champagne
Pommery Brut Rosé Royal €39.25
Champagne Soutiran Rosé de Saignée Brut €38.52
Champagne Vranken Demoiselle €36.75
Champagne De Saint-Gall Le Rosé €34.95 - €35.95
Champagne
Ayala Rosé Majeur €34.95
Champagne Philippe Gonet €34.22
Champagne Greno Brut Rosé €33.99 (½ price at €16.99)
Champagne Piper Heidsieck Rosé Sauvage €27.99 - €32.95
Champagne Château de Bligny Grande Reserve Brut Rosé €32.00
Champagne Duval-LeRoy Brut Rosé €30.95
Champagne Dom Caudron Le Meunier Conjugué en Rosé €29.45
Champagne Canard-Duchêne Rosé €22.90 - €28.55
Champagne Charles de Cazanove Vieille France Brut Rosé €27.00
Champagne Chanoir-F… Brut Rosé €26.99
Champagne Gratiot & Cie Rosé €26.29
Champagne
Nicolas Feuillatte Grande Reserve Rosé €25.99
Champagne François Dubois Emotion Rosée Demi-Sec €24.99
Champagne Brice Brut Rosé €24.90
Champagne J.M. Gobillard & Fils Cuvée Prestige Brut Rosé €23.99
Champagne
Xavier Loriot Collision Meunier Rosé €23.95 - €27.50
Champagne Vollereaux Rosé de Saignée Brut €23.83
Champagne Georges Lacombe Rosé Brut €23.80
Champagne Bauchet Seduction Rosé Brut €23.75
Champagne Lamiable Grand Cru Rosé €23.66
Champagne Sadi Malot Premier Cru Rosé d'Exception Brut €22.99
Champagne F. Dubois (also François Dubois 1764) Pur Rosé €22.90 €26.95
Champagne Charles de Cazanove Rosé €22.90

Champagne François Dubois Brut Rosé €21.95
Champagne Yves Jacques Rosé Brut €21.44
Champagne
Achille Princier Rosé €20.47
Champagne J.M. Gobillard & Fils Rosé Brut €19.95
Champagne Emille …. €19.95
Champagne Veuve Clesse Rosé €17.95 - €19.50
Champagne Charles d'Harleville Rosé Brut €17.90
Crémant de Luxembourg St Martin 100 ans Rosé Brut €12.50 - €14.95
Cava Codornîu Gran Plus Ultra Pinot Noir Brut-Reserva Vintage 2016 €12.09
Crémant de Luxembourg KOX Cuvée Rosé Brut €11.89
Crémant de Luxembourg Desom Brut Rosé €11.85
Cava Codorníu Raventós Selección de la Familia €11.59
Crémant de Luxembourg Krier Pinot Noir Brut €10.18 - €11.55
Crémant Poll-Fabaire Pinot Noir Brut €9.65 - €10.69 - €10.70 - €10.99 - €13.30
Crémant de Luxembourg St Martin Rosé Brut €8.52 - €8.98
Crémant de Luxembourg Bernard-Massard Cuvée de l'Ecusson Pinot Noir Brut €8.89 - €8.90 - €8.95 - €9.40
Crémant de Luxembourg
Gales Cuvée Première Rosé Brut €8.75
Cava Perlanda Brut Rosé Festival €8.69
Crémant de Luxembourg Gales Héritage Brut Rosé €8.50 - €10.30 - €10.48
Crémant de Luxembourg Poll-Fabaire Rosé Brut €8.44 - €9.50 - €10.50 - €10.70
Crémant d'Alsace Arthur Metz 'Dupuis 1904' Rosé €8.25
Crémant de Loire De Chanceny Brut Rosé €8.19
Crémant de Bourgogne Moillard Brut Rosé €7.95
Cava Codorníu Barcelona Cuvée 1872 Rosé €7.75
Crémant de Luxembourg Bernard-Massard Selection Brut Rosé €7.55
Crémant de Bourgogne Chevalier Classique €9.69
Cava Codorníu Vintage 2017 Rosado €6.59
Crémant d'Alsace Ame du Terroir Rosé €5.99
Crémant de Luxembourg Krier Cuvée Élysée Rosé Brut €5.65
Crémant de Luxembourg St Martin Carte Blanche Rosé Brut €5.24 - €5.60
Cava Codorníu Rosado €4.95 - €4.99 - €6.50
Cava Freixenet Cordon Rosado Gran Selección €3.99 - €4.79 - €4.98 - €5.40


Crémant d'Alsace Ziegler Brut Réserve €
Crémant de Bourgogne Caves de Marsigny Rosé Extra-Dry €

Now for the tasting, and we will start with one of our favourites…

Champagne Perrier-Jouët Blason Rosé


Perrier-Jouet Blason Rose

Perrier-Jouët Blason Rosé is a non-vintage brut wine composed of 50% Pinot Noir, 25% Pinot Meunier and 25% Chardonnay, and includes 10% to 15% of reserve red wines. According to the technical sheet this Champagne is blended from up to 50 different crus.
The colour is often defined as a luminous medium cooked salmon-pink colour with a touch of copper highlights. So pink but still a bit pale.
No trace of aggressive bubbles.
Average acidity, crisp, fresh, floral, and quite long and satisfying in the mouth. No acid attack, and just a nice touch of sweetness.
Easy to drink. The kind of Champagne you could drink too much of at a Sunday brunch on the terrace.

France produced in excess of 500 million bottles of Champagne and sparkling wines annually, and domestic consumption is around 65%. Champagne represents about 300 million bottles per year.

Champagne Bottle Types

There are three 'classic' shapes for Champagne wine bottles, from left to right, the butterfly, standard, and skittle. The standard is a tall Burgundy-like bottle with a flat label panel. The key feature is to withstand the pressure exerted on the bottle by a sparkling wine, through production, storage and consumption. This website on bottle typing more or less confirms that the standard Champagne bottle has been in use since the early-19th C.

HeritageCodorníu Bottle

There is also a bottle design (on the left) called Champagne Cuvée where the bottom is larger and the neck longer, and I've seen this form also called 'prestige' or 'heritage'. Also Krug and Laurent-Perrier Cuvée Rosé have custom bottle shapes. I've read that the bottle shape (on the right) used by the Cava producer Codorníu is called a 'gothic' bottle, but it is also called 'bell-shaped'.

Gales Héritage Rosé - Crémant de Luxembourg


Gales Heritage Cremant Luxembourg

Gales Héritage is a Crémant de Luxembourg. Gales started producing wine in 1916, and today the same family produces a wide variety of white wines, including seven different wines using traditional methods. Two of these wines are classed Crémant du Luxembourg, one a pure Riesling, and the other, the Héritage, an assemblage of Riesling, Pinot blanc and a small amount of Auxerrois (see 'fiche technique'). The Héritage Rosé is produced with Pinot Noir.
The colour is a very pale pink.
Quite aggressive bubbles, and quite fizzy.
Light, fresh, not too dry, and not particularly long in the mouth.
Easy to drink. This kind of
Crémant works as an apéritif with some warm amuse-bouche on a nice summer's day. It could also be a nice wine to go with a summer lunch of meaty fish or langoustines in a rich creamy sauce. I'm less convinced that it would work as an apéritif on a cold winter's night.

Champagne Ayala Rosé Majeur


Champagne Ayala Rose Majeur

Ayala is a traditional French producer, now part of the Bollinger family. Rosé Majeur is a non-vintage brut wine composed of 50% Chardonnay, 40% Pinot Noir (including 6% red wine), and 10% Pinot Meunier (see data sheet).
A light pink colour, perhaps a touch pale.
No trace of aggressive bubbles.
Average acidity, floral, and refreshing. No acid attack, and pleasant to drink.
Fine as an apéritif with a nice selection of
amuse-bouche, but I don't see it on the dinner table. But it's rated highly, so maybe I'm missing something.

Krier Pinot Noir Rosé - Crémant de Luxembourg


Krier Cremant Pinot Noir Rose Brut

Krier Rosé is a Crémant de Luxembourg made with the Pinot Noir grape. The house was founded in 1914, and is still run as a family business. Today they produce a variety of wines, including three different Crémant.
The colour is a pale cooked salmon pink, but is darker than some other
Crémant in the market.
Quite aggressive bubbles, and quite fizzy.
Light, fresh, not too dry, and I found the Pinot Noir quite evident.
Easy to drink. Could go with
amuse-bouche, but others would do a better job. The producers claims that this rosé could go well with fried mushrooms or spring-rolls, both with a spicy chilli dip. Worth a try.

Champagne Vielle France, Brut Rosé


Champagne Vieille France Rose Vieille France

The first thing you note is that they use the 18th C style 'apple bottle', rather than the customary 'pear bottle' used today.
The
Vielle France appears to be a 'limited edition' belonging to Charles de Cazanove, which is part of a larger group that produces over 6 million bottles per years and sells to supermarkets, wholesalers and wine merchants under a variety of labels. Collectively the 'family' owns 200 hectares in over 53 villages.
Vielle France is a non-vintage
brut wine composed of 45% Chardonnay, 30% Pinot Noir, 10% Pinot Meunier and 15% red wine.
The colour is a slightly stronger pink than some other Champagnes, but not excessively so.
No trace of aggressive bubbles.
Average acidity, fresh, no acid attack, not particularly fruity and not that long in the mouth.
Easy to drink, but I was left asking myself why I would buy this Champagne over another. Has some good reviews, so deserves a retrial.

We tried this Champagne again, and we were again disappointed. It's just a bit too yeasty and citric, and not sufficiently rich and fruity for our taste.

The Champagne Vielle France you see mentioned a lot has the same shaped bottle, but a different label for the brut (see above on the right). Frankly, I don't know if there is a difference or not, but in any case we would avoid this Champagne.

Champagne Canard-Duchêne Rose


Canard-Duchene

Canard-Duchêne are producers since 1868 and their non-vintage brut rosé wine is composed of 40% Pinot Meunier, 30% Chardonnay, 30% Pinot Noir and 10% Pinot Noir wine (check out the 'fiche produit'). It is certified vegan.
Nice rosé colour.
No trace of aggressive bubbles.
Average acidity, fresh, no acid attack, and you can taste the red fruit.
Easy to drink, and I must admit I enjoyed it. The producer suggests to drink it with grilled white meat and finely sliced
Serrano ham. I would agree with the first idea, but not with the second. Personally I think this is a nice aperitif Champagne.

Codorníu Rosado Cava


Codorniu non-clasico

Codorníu is one of the two main producers of Cava (along with Freixenet), and this rosé is made from Monastrell, Grenache and Trepat grapes (so not the traditional Macabeo, Parellada and Xarel·lo varieties).
Quite a deep rosé colour, and looks a bit 'artificial' when compared with Champagne.
Bubbly, with a touch more acidity than with a good Champagne. Tastes fresh and perhaps a bit yeasty but not that noticeable.
Easy to drink, and I must admit I enjoyed it. The producer suggests to drink it with rice dishes, but I'm not sure on that idea. However, I agree with the producer that it's a very nice aperitif
Cava, and as such goes really well with tapas on a sunny evening.
Fantastic value for money. On the producers website this wine costs €7.99, but you can often find it supermarkets around Europe at prices from €5 to €6.50.

It's fascinating to note that I could not find an image of the exact Cava I tasted. On the web there are a multitude of images of Codorníu 'Clasico Rosado' but the one I tasted did not have the 'Clasico' on the label. You can find the one I tasted under Codorníu Brut Cava Rosado on amazon.co.uk but everywhere else you see 'Clasico Rosado' on the label. Even the Codorníu website only mentions the 'Clasico Rosado'. Is there a difference?

Having tasted a number of Cava rosado wines from both Codorníu and Freixenet, my preference is clearly for Codorníu.

Spain produces more than 220 million bottles of Cava wine per year, and Codorníu and Freixenet produce 92% of all Cava.

Champagne Veuve Clesse Rosé



Veuve Clesse is a wine produced by J. Charpentier, but it does not appear on his website and his name is not mentioned on the bottle. According to some reports it is composed of 80% Pinot Meunier and 20% Pinot Noir, but other reports indicated an even higher percentage of Pinot Meunier.

Opening this bottle, blew the cork and we lost a good glassful of Champagne. The smell and taste was odd, and only after two days left in the fridge did it taste almost acceptable. Normally I would avoid this Champagne like the plague, but given the positive tasting reviews, I plan to try a second bottle.

Codorníu Raventós 'Selección de la Familia' Cava


Codorniu Raventos

Codorníu is one of the two main producers of Cava (along with Freixenet), and this rosé is blended from Pinot Noir with Macabeu, Xarel·lo, and Parellada grapes. Now this particular rosé Reventós 'Selección de la Familia' does not appear on the Codorníu website, nor is there a photograph of the label on the web. However there is a totally different website dedicated to Raventós Codorníu, which presents the history of the company and its wineries, but does not present the individual wines on offer (and the 'shop' does not work). There are photographs of some other wines, e.g. 'Seleccón Raventós', but not this specific Cava.
Frankly, I found this particular
Cava excellent, well balanced, slightly fizzy, not too acidic, and light and fresh.
I think this wine can work both as an aperitif and as a companion to most fish and white meat dishes. We particularly like it with Chinese or Indian meals.
At about €12 a bottle it's a mid-range
Cava, but well worth it's price.

Having tasted a number of
Cava rosado wines from both Codorníu and Freixenet, my preference is clearly for Codorníu.

Crémant d'Alsace Arthur Metz 'Depuis 1904' Rosé Sec


Arthur Metz Cremant

The Crémant 'Dupuis 1904' does not appear on the Arthur Metz website, although it did figure in 'Le Guide Hachette 2018', where we learned that the 'maison de négoce' was founded in 1904. The producers website does mention 'la noble Cuvée 1904' as being one of four wines now called the cuvée spéciales "Réserve de l'Abbaye", but it's now called 'Réserve de l'Abbaye Sec Rosé'.
On the label we learned that the '
sec rosé' is made from 100% Pinot Noir.

Whilst the price was very competitive, I did not find it memorable, and I would prefer to pay a little more and go for a good
Cave rosado.

Freixenet Cordon Rosado Gran Selección Cava


Freixenet Rosado

Freixenet is the largest producer of traditional method sparkling wine worldwide. On the Freixenet website you have to enter through a country portal. Using Belgium we find our exact wine, with 70% Trepat and 30% Grenache. On the UK website the presentation is completely different, but the wine is still identified as 'Cordon Rosado', even if the mention of 'Brut' on the neck label has changed to 'Rosé'. Turning to the Spanish website the 'Cordon' has disappeared and this wine is just called 'Brut Rosé' and 'Brut' is back on the neck label.

One nice suggestion on the Belgian website was that this wine was well suited to pasta dishes, but on the UK website they suggest paella, which to me sounds quite odd. It's interesting how tastes change, because the produced on their Spanish website match the wine with rice, grilled white fish, and dairy-based desserts.

Having tasted a number of
Cava rosado wines from both Codorníu and Freixenet, my preference is clearly for Codorníu.

Champagne François Dubois 'Pur Rosé'



François DuboisF Dubois

The 'Pur Rosé' from François Dubois is composed of 65% Chardonnay, 20% Pinot Noir, 5% Pinot Meunier, with the addition of 10% red wine.

I must admit I thought that this Champagne was very well balanced, and we really enjoyed it at meal times. The producer recommends it as an aperitif, or with veal and fruit desserts. The idea of a veal filet with a nice light sauce and this Champagne sounds very enticing, and I think it could also go well with a fruit tart.

Interestingly I could not find the exact same bottle and label on the producers website, nor on the web. You can see above the label on our bottle as compared to that on the producers website. I've also found the 'François Dubois' Pur Rosé with a different necktie marked 1764 Rosé.

Bernard-Massard 'Cuvée de l'Ecusson' - Crémant de Luxembourg



Bernard-Massard is a family-run producer of wines and Crémant. They are based in the Palais Pillishof in Trier in Germany, but are a major player in the Luxembourg market.
As a
Crémant it's quite fizzy, and the colour quite bright but transparent. For me it's a little too acidic and the Pinot Noir is not sufficiently pronounced. There are better Luxembourg Crémant and Spanish Cava on the market.

The producer quotes a price of €10.24/bottle, whereas in supermarkets it retails at between €8.89 and €9.40.

Codorníu Barcelona Cuvée 1872 Rosé


Codorníu Barcelona Cuvée 1872 Rosé

Codorníu is a major producer of Cava, and Barcelona Cuvée 1872 Rosé is supposed to celebrate the year in which Josep Raventós produced the first bottle of Cava rosado. The technical sheet explains that the wine is produced using the traditional methods employed 50 years ago, however it does not mention the type of grapes used.
The bottle is pleasant to look at, and the
rosé is an attractive pink. It is a touch less fizzy than the usual Cava and has a nice fresh taste that would go well as an aperitif. The producer mentions rice dishes, seafood, etc. which sounds nice, but they also mention casseroles and stews where I would prefer a solid red wine. I wonder if this Cava would go well with spicy Indian food… worth a try.

At less that €8/bottle this is excellent value for money.

Having tasted a number of Cava rosado wines from both Codorníu and Freixenet, my preference is clearly for Codorníu.

Champagne François Dubois Brut Rosé


Champagne François Dubois Brut Rosé

Champagne François Dubois Brut Rosé is composed of 65% Chardonnay, 20% Pinot Noir, 5% Pinot Meunier, with the addition of 10% red wine.
I like the nice light salmon colour, the fruity taste. I must admit I thought that this Champagne was very well balanced, and we really enjoyed it at meal times. The producer recommends it as an aperitif, or with grilled meats/fish. The idea with the grilled food and this Champagne sounds very enticing for those Sunday lunch BBQ's.

Codorníu Gran Plus Ultra Pinot Noir Brut-Reserva Vintage 2016


Codorniu Gran-Plus-Ultra Pinot Noir

Cava Codornîu Gran Plus Ultra Pinot Noir Brut-Reserva Vintage 2016 is a 100% Pinot Noir Cava.
This is possibly my favourite
Cava, it has a nice salmon pink colour and is not too fizzy. The technical sheet tells us about the vilification. But for me this wine is far more than just a copy of a rosé Champagne, it has a unique character given by the Pinot Noir.
It is not too dry, and not acidic, but has a very round and pronounced taste. The producer suggests that it goes with rice and oily fish such as salmon and sushi. I personally could drink this
Cava with almost anything.

At around €12/bottle, this Cava is fantastic value for money.

Having tasted a number of
Cava rosado wines from both Codorníu and Freixenet, my preference is clearly for Codorníu.

Desom Brut Rosé - Crémant de Luxembourg


Desom Cremant

Desom Brut Rosé is a Luxembourg Crémant with a slightly stronger salmon colour than many Crémant. This is certainly due to the Pinot Noir, but I don't known the exact composition.
For me it was, as usual, quite fizzy, but was not too acidic, and tasted quite well balanced.

It is one of the more expensive Crémant from Luxembourg, but I don't think it stands out as such. And it does not compare favourable with some of the better
Cava options. However Desom is a well established family concern, and we have eaten at their restaurant several times. It is one of the better bistro restaurants in the region, and usually our preference has gone to their Pinot Gris white wine.

Gales Cuvée Première Rosé Brut - Crémant de Luxembourg


Gales Cuvée Première Rosé Brut

Gales Cuvée Première Rosé Brut is a 100% Pinot Noir Crémant. It is exactly what you would expect from a Crémant, pale salmon colour, and quite fizzy. I like Pinot Noir, but frankly for the same price I prefer the Cava Codorníu Barcelona Cuvée 1872 Rosé.

Champagne J.M. Gobillard & Fils Rosé Brut


Champagne J.M. Gobillard & Fils Rosé Brut

Champagne J.M. Gobillard & Fils Rosé Brut is composed of 30% Chardonnay, 35% Pinot Noir, 35% Pinot Meunier, with the addition of 10% red wine. Nice salmon colour, but a bit acidic and fizzy. Quire fruity and I think it could go well with a rich fish or shellfish. Competitively priced at about €20/bottle, and as one reviewer wrote "better than any Crémant".

Champagne Lamiable Grand Cru Rosé


Lamiable Eclats d etoiles Lamiable

Champagne Lamiable Grand Cru Rosé does not appear on the producers website, however the label tells us that it is composed of 65% Pinot Noir and 35% Chardonnay, with 60% from 2015 and 40% from 'réserve perpetuelle', and 'dégorgement' 01/2019. On the website they do have a Éclats d'étoiles Grand Cru Rosé Brut which is composed of 70% Pinot Noir and 30% Chardonnay.
Nice salmon colour, not too fizzy or acidic, and a very pleasant rounded taste of fruit.

We found this on the bottom shelf in a supermarket, and it was excellent. I've see this same Champagne as an Extra Brut so check the label.

Champagne Bauchet Séduction Rosé Brut




Champagne Bauchet Séduction Rosé Brut




Champagne Chanoir-Fresne Brut Rosé




Champagne Deutz Rosé




Champagne Brice Rosé Brut




Champagne Sadi Malot Rosé d'Exception Premier Cru